Events

Interpretation/Speech Events

Humorous Interpretation – The student will perform a memorized cut from a play, short story, novel or poem that is humorous in nature. The student may portray more than one character and may use a variety of voices and bodily expressions. The contestant is required to have an introduction that states the title and author of the selection. The student may choose to perform a short portion of the selection prior to the introduction as a preview or “teaser.” During competition, the time limit is 10 minutes with a 30 second grace.

Dramatic Interpretation – Same as HI, but the selection will be dramatic in nature.

Prose Interpretation – The student will present a cut from a short story or novel. The selection does not have to be memorized. The student will have a small black binder that contains their script. The contestant is required to have an introduction that states the title and author of the selection. The student may choose to perform a short portion of the selection prior to the introduction. During competition, the time limit is 7 minutes with a 30 second grace.

Poetry Interpretation – Same as prose, but the cut must be from a poetic selection. The contestant may present a variety of poems that are thematically linked.

Duet Acting – Two students will present a cutting from a play, short story, novel, or poem. The contestants will have 2 chairs to use in their scene. Selections may be humorous or dramatic in nature. During competition, the time limit is 12 minutes with a 30 second grace period. The contestants should have an introduction that states the title and author of the selection. The students may choose to perform a short portion prior to the introduction.

Duo Interpretation – Two students present monologues simultaneously and do not interact. During competition, the time limit is 10 minutes. Other than time and a lack of physical interaction, it is similar to Duet Acting.

Public Speaking Events

United States or Domestic Extemporaneous Speaking – Students will draw a topic in another room (usually a library or auditorium). They will have 30 minutes to prepare a speech on that topic. Topics are generally current and relevant to the United States. When they come to the room of competition, the student has 7 minutes to present their prepared speech, with a 30 second grace. The speech should be structured with an introduction, body, and conclusion. Students will cite the sources from where they got their information. Time signals are given to speakers.

Original Oratory – The student will present an original speech. Students pick their own topic and present a structured speech that is memorized. The speech should make a point or have a lasting meaning. The speech should be informative and persuasive in nature. Humor is acceptable. Students offer sources from where they did their research. The time limit is 10 minutes with a 30 second grace.

Debate Events

Public Forum Debate – PFD involves two pairs (teams) debating monthly controversial resolutions that usually come from current events. Rounds begin with a coin toss between the competing teams to determine side and order (Pro-Con or Con-Pro). Public Forum tests skills in argumentation, cross-examination, and refutation. Unlike other debate events, the central idea behind Public Forum Debate is that the arguments should be understandable and accessible for anyone.

Congressional Debate – A mock legislature where students are provided legislation that they research and prepare speeches for before the competition begins. Each student will have opportunities to debate, either affirming or negating the legislation. Each speech is 3 minutes, with a questioning period often following.

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